Highway of Tears: A True Story of Racism, Indifference, and the Pursuit of Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

 

This true crime book is the first by journalist Jessica McDiarmid. She tackles the sad, yet powerful topic of the many missing and murdered young aboriginal females who have disappeared through the years along the road that is called The Highway of Tears in Canada. It gives some good background on the road and on the young women who have disappeared.. Some were eventually found dead, others never were found at all, leaving the families in agony, always to wonder about their loved one. The pain is only intensified when occasionally a young white female would go missing and the response would be so great to help the family search. It just exaggerated the size of the canyon of difference between what happened when an aboriginal family needed help after their child went missing, namely not much. No great outpouring of people and sympathy and funds for flyers and a reward. No helicopters or trained search dogs. Many mostly ignored for the first couple of days, turned away with excuses.

This is a really good read with true crime, racial bias and injustice, and more. You can see that the author has really done a deep dive on the subject   Advance electronic review copy was provided by NetGalley, author Jessica McDiarmid, and the publisher.


 

 

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Publisher: Atria Books – 320 pages
Publication: Nov 12th, 2019
RATED: 4/5 Stars


The Author- Jessica McDiarmid is a Canadian journalist who has written about human rights, racial conflicts and social justice in publications such as the Associated Press, CBC, and The Toronto Star. She grew up near the Highway of Tears and has been investigating the murders for the past five years. This is her first book.


 

4 thoughts on “BOOK REVIEW ~ Highway of Tears

  1. Thanks enjoyed your review, and Esquire Magazine actually did a good article/reportage on this topic including how their are many issues with communication with tribal law enforcement and other outside law enforcement agencies, which has hampered the investigations, etc. Probably not as in-depth as this book, but it was a good article.

    Liked by 1 person

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